Claudia's Pics

1. What is your role at Bridgeman?

I head up print and digital marketing for all of our North American markets. My role as Marketing Executive affords me the great privilege to oversee 2+ million images and footage content and develop strategies to market our content to new and existing clients. I love working with our Sales team to design campaigns that showcase how deep and diverse our content runs. 

2. What do you love most about the job?

I love working with images. I always have. As a sophomore in high school, I decided that I wanted to study photography at NYU and that’s exactly what I did. I feel incredibly fortunate to have access to such a unique archive and to use what I know about photography and imaging to help our clients tell their stories in the most creative ways. As I'm privy to such a plethora of content, some of the hardest decisions I have to make are choosing what images to use where but that, in itself, is what I love most. 

3. What misconceptions do clients most commonly have about the archive?

I like to explain working for an archive with the following analogy…let’s say I have 100 pairs of shoes (sigh)…well, what good is it if no one can see them? The issue of visibility is an archive’s greatest struggle and many clients often assume that we only have classical fine art images. My job is to make sure that we are running campaigns to illustrate the variety within the Bridgeman archive: photography, fashion, design, political science, religion… – basically, to wear as many of those pairs of shoes as possible. Not to mention that we have staff members dedicated to helping our clients find exactly what they need so if you want some help, please don’t hesitate to give us a call or shoot us an email

 

Claudia Aires, Marketing Executive, North America
Claudia Aires, Marketing Executive, North America

 

 

Pool in pleasure park, Manzanar Relocation Center, California, 1943 (photo), Ansel Adams (1902-84) / Universal History Archive/UIG / Bridgeman Images
Pool in pleasure park, Manzanar Relocation Center, California, 1943 (photo), Ansel Adams (1902-84) / Universal History Archive/UIG / Bridgeman Images

 

 

Ansel Adams

Ansel Adams, born in 1902, was an American photographer and environmentalist. I am sure my love for Adams’ work is partly because I grew up in California and partly because he was the first photographer I ever really studied in school. Either way, Adams’ work has left a lasting impression on my mind – for the way the American landscape used to look, for the time he spent making each image and for the stories his work tells about nature, strife and humanity. In response to the work Adams created in the Yosemite Valley, he states: “Yosemite Valley, to me, is always a sunrise, a glitter of green and golden wonder in a vast edifice of stone and space…at first the colossal aspect may dominate; then we perceive and respond to the delicate and persuasive complex of nature”. 

 

 

 

Frank Lloyd Wright

I am indebted to my parents for introducing me to Frank Lloyd Wright at such a young age. We visited Wright’s home in Oak Park, Illinois and I instantly fell in love with the wide open spaces, the integration of nature within the home itself and the feeling that light could enter at any point throughout the house. There was a feeling of incredible calm and expansion all at once. I later found out that Wright hated the concept of walls because they were ‘a waste of space’. Of course, this could be a metaphor for life but ever since my childhood visit, I have been fascinated by the integration of exteriors and interiors – breaking down walls to see what can exist in the in-between. 

 

Arthur Heurtley House (photo) / Oak Park, Illinois, U.S.A. / © Valerie Bennett / Bridgeman Images
Arthur Heurtley House (photo) / Oak Park, Illinois, U.S.A. / © Valerie Bennett / Bridgeman Images

 

 

Sobriety, Obesity and Growing Old, 1991 (pen & ink and wash on paper), William Kentridge (b.1955) / The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Israel / Gift of the British Friends of the Art Museums in Israel and / The Mauerberger Foundation / Bridgeman Images
Sobriety, Obesity and Growing Old, 1991 (pen & ink and wash on paper), William Kentridge (b.1955) / The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Israel / Gift of the British Friends of the Art Museums in Israel and / The Mauerberger Foundation / Bridgeman Images

 

 

William Kentridge

My family is originally from South Africa and I was born in Johannesburg before emigrating to San Diego. As a South African Jew, it is important to know where I come from and the artists who have shaped the way I see the world. William Kentridge was born in 1955 to Jewish parents who were both lawyers and famous for their defense of victims of apartheid. Kentridge developed an ability to remove himself from a highly politicized environment and instead, chose to create sparse, rough, expressive images that illustrate a vulnerable and uncomfortable situation. For years, I was repulsed by a Kentridge painting we had in our home – I found it completely frightening and jarring. Only when I was older, and could look past the painting and into the historical context within which it was created, did I find it fascinating, bold and even beautiful. Kentridge has since become one of my most favorite artists for his ability to use the canvas as a lens on both himself and on the world around him. 

 

Richard Serra

It is rare, I find, to remember and acknowledge how small and insignificant we are in the world. Living in New York City only exacerbated this issue until I found myself completely enveloped by one of Richard Serra’s sculptures about 10 years ago. Serra, born in San Francisco in 1939, helped support himself by working in steel mills which continues to have a strong influence on his contemporary sculptural work. Serra’s father worked in a shipyard as a pipe-fitter which added another layer to Serra’s interest in working with raw materials. Saying of his early memory: “…All the raw material that I needed is contained in the reserve of this memory which has become a reoccurring dream”. Beginning in 1970, Serra turned his focus to the great outdoors and became a pioneer of large-scale site-specific sculpture. Simply put, his work dwarfs the observer. Each sculpture challenges viewers’ perception of their own bodies in relation to space and time, motivating a sensation of nothingness. 

 

The Matter of Time, 1994-2005, eight sculptures of steel by artist Richard Serra, Exhibition Selecciones de la Coleccion, Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain, 2013 (photo), German Photographer, (20th century) / © SZ Photo / Jose Giribas / Bridgeman Images
The Matter of Time, 1994-2005, eight sculptures of steel by artist Richard Serra, Exhibition Selecciones de la Coleccion, Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain, 2013 (photo), German Photographer, (20th century) / © SZ Photo / Jose Giribas / Bridgeman Images

 

 

Pas de deux from Act IV of Swan Lake, performed by Maria Tallchief and Nicholas Magallanes, 1956 / Creative Arts Television / Bridgeman Images
Pas de deux from Act IV of Swan Lake, performed by Maria Tallchief and Nicholas Magallanes, 1956 / Creative Arts Television / Bridgeman Images

 

 

Swan Lake

I find the ballet completely mesmerizing. My mom and I have been attending the ballet together for years now and while we are close, the experience of watching the ballet together adds yet another dimension to our relationship. In this clip of Swan Lake, we see footwork so magnificent that it is almost incomprehensible. And then of course, the best dancers always make it seem so perfect, so flawless. Recently, I’ve become most fascinated with George Balanchine who so firmly declares: “Why are you stingy with yourselves? Why are you holding back? What are you saving for—for another time? There are no other times. There is only right now. Right now”. We see this attitude in each dancer, an unrelenting will to turn faster, jump higher and leave the audience breathless. I love the ballet for its ability to take me out of my world and into another, even if just for a moment. 


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