Julian Barrow (1939 - 2013)

"A prolific traditionalist, he painted almost 1,000 country seats, great and small, across the world, in a style that was reassuringly conventional but not dull..."

Excerpt describing Julian Barrow from obituary in The Telegraph.  Read the full obituary.

(Detail) Houses of Parliament, 2010 (oil on canvas) by Julian Barrow
(Detail) Houses of Parliament, 2010 (oil on canvas) by Julian Barrow

Born in North West England in 1939, Barrow lived most of his life in London. For almost fifty years he worked in a Chelsea studio building, occupied at various times by Whistler, Sargent and Augustus John.

After a brief period at art school, he spent several years studying under Pietro Annigoni in Florence, followed by an apprenticeship in the restoration department of the National Gallery. Painting only in oils, he is best known for his town and landscapes as well as paintings of country houses. He travelled extensively to paint and has held exhibitions in New York, the Middle East, and regularly in London. He was the current President of the Chelsea Arts Society and has exhibited at the Royal Academy many times.

View works by Julian Barrow

Blackfriars Bridge, 2010 (oil on canvas)
Blackfriars Bridge, 2010 (oil on canvas)

Madison Avenue, 1997 (oil on canvas)
Madison Avenue, 1997 (oil on canvas)

A friend to all of us at Bridgeman, our New York team remembers Julian fondly for his regular pop-ins on his city painting trips. He was a long-time friend of Harriet Bridgeman, and was the first artist Harriet asked to be a trustee for the Artists' Collecting Society board. Harriet and Julian also worked together to raise money for a statue of Whistler, which now stands by the Battersea Bridge and overlooks the stretch of the Thames he so often painted. 

Harriet said of her friend,

"Julian was charming, always welcoming, diplomatic and quietly enthusiastic, the sort of person one is always so happy to see."

Attended by well over one-thousand friends and family, the funeral service took place on September 23 at St. Luke's in Chelsea, with a luncheon afterwards at Chelsea Town Hall. In addition to readings by his three brothers, a poem by John Donne was recited by his good friend and fellow artist, Richard Foster.


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